musical instruments – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 00:21:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png musical instruments – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 Long & McQuade opens second store in Greater Victoria https://swedishmusicshop.com/long-mcquade-opens-second-store-in-greater-victoria/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/long-mcquade-opens-second-store-in-greater-victoria/ The national music retailer has a store on Hillside Avenue in Victoria; he opens a second store on Jacklin Road in Langford Long & McQuade, the national music retailer with an established location in Victoria and a 40-year history in the region, is opening a new purpose-built store in Langford. Chief executive Mike Arensen said […]]]>

The national music retailer has a store on Hillside Avenue in Victoria; he opens a second store on Jacklin Road in Langford

Long & McQuade, the national music retailer with an established location in Victoria and a 40-year history in the region, is opening a new purpose-built store in Langford.

Chief executive Mike Arensen said the company is keeping up with the region’s growing population growth, the addition of several new elementary and secondary schools and the growing number of musicians living in Langford, Colwood and other West Shore areas. .

The new Long & McQuade is under construction at 3108 Jacklin Rd., on the site of the old Trading Post building near Sooke Road. The 10,000 square foot two-story building is in its infancy, with a steel frame.

Arensen said the new store is expected to open Dec. 1.

He said it will be set up similarly to the Hillside Avenue store, with musical instruments, sheet music and electronics on the first floor and a large music lesson space above.

“We’ve been looking at the West Bank for quite a long time – it’s part of our long-term strategy,” Arensen said. “We have a lot of long-time customers who live there and many students participate in group programs, so we’re happy to bring a store closer to them.”

He said the increase in the number of new schools in Langford and Colwood will lead to a growing demand for rental instruments and band lessons – a large part of Long & McQuade’s business, as the company supplies everything from violins and saxophones to drums and guitars.

It will be a homecoming for Long & McQuade, which opened its first Greater Victoria store in Langford between the West Shore RCMP Detachment and the old Langford Fire Station in 1982.

Long & McQuade employee Shaun Wilson, who has worked for the company for 32 years, grew up in Langford and recently returned as a resident. He plans to work at the new store when it opens and says he looks forward to “closing the loop” and working in his hometown.

This will be the fourth location on the island for Long & McQuade, which also has stores in Nanaimo and Courtenay.

The company, which has approximately 90 locations across the country, is owned by the Long family of Pickering, Ontario, and is still led by 92-year-old Jack Long, who founded the company in 1956. Jack McQuade left the company in 1965.

dkloster@timescolonist.com

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Amazon offering up to 60% off keyboards, microphones. Know more https://swedishmusicshop.com/amazon-offering-up-to-60-off-keyboards-microphones-know-more/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 06:57:44 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/amazon-offering-up-to-60-off-keyboards-microphones-know-more/ Amazon has announced “Sound of Music Store” for all music and entertainment enthusiasts, bringing together a host of great deals on a range of keyboards, guitars, microphones and more. Customers can take advantage of a plethora of great deals from popular brands like Yamaha, Casio, Maono and more. “Sound of Music Store” will be live […]]]>

Amazon has announced “Sound of Music Store” for all music and entertainment enthusiasts, bringing together a host of great deals on a range of keyboards, guitars, microphones and more. Customers can take advantage of a plethora of great deals from popular brands like Yamaha, Casio, Maono and more. “Sound of Music Store” will be live on Amazon.in until March 10.

Customers can get up to 60% off keyboards, guitars, microphones, DJ gear and more. In addition, they can also benefit from a free EMI offer with a price drop on certain models.

Here are some popular musical instruments and accessories with deals and offers:

Audio Technica ATH-M20x

The ATH-M50 is a combination of audio and build quality, whether in the studio or on the go. This award-winning formula is embodied in the new, remastered M-Series range, with a model perfectly suited to every discerning listener. Contoured earcups seal tightly for excellent sound isolation, with minimal bleeding. And the pro-grade materials are durable, yet comfortable. M-Series professional monitor headphones deliver precise sound and exceptional comfort that get the job done. Hour after hour, year after year. This professional studio monitor headset is available for 4,599.

Boya BYM1 Lavalier Omnidirectional Condenser Microphone

BOYA BY-M1 is an omnidirectional lavalier microphone, designed for smartphones, DSLRs, camcorders, audio recorders, etc. It is super effective for presentations and video-audio recorders. This microphone is available for 690.

Casio SA-77 keyboard 44 mini keys

Start your child’s musical journey by gifting them a Casio Mini keyboard. Casio Mini keyboards are a great way to introduce kids to music. Let eager minds explore one of 100 tones, including instruments from all corners of the globe, and discover exciting musical styles with the 50 built-in drum rhythm patterns. This keyboard is available for 3,995.

Intern INT-38C Sunburst Acoustic Guitar Kit

This basic acoustic guitar kit from the house of Intern features great quality, impeccable styling and a very attractive look. The guitar is designed with all the different dynamics in mind that affect sound, playing comfort and versatility. It comes with all the essential accessories needed to start your musical experience with a guitar. This acoustic guitar is available for 1,890.

Juarez JRZ23UK/NA 23″ Concert Size Ukulele Kit

This Juarez 23-inch ukulele is an easy-to-learn four-string plucked instrument that also boosts the potential of rhythm instruments. The sapele body and the Okoume neck bring you a richer and brighter sound. Rosewood fingerboard and bridge provide a comfortable playing feel. Chrome metal tuners ensure that your instrument will stay steady and stable. This ukulele kit is available for 1997.

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Foot tapping fun – Door County Pulse https://swedishmusicshop.com/foot-tapping-fun-door-county-pulse/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 00:29:33 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/foot-tapping-fun-door-county-pulse/ Live music around the door Looking to brighten up your week with some tunes? Check out these performances! breakfast club March 4, 7-10:30 p.m., Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N. 1st Ave. in Sturgeon Bay This authentic reproduction of the timeless musical and dance hits of the 80s will still have your blood pumping. […]]]>

Live music around the door

Looking to brighten up your week with some tunes? Check out these performances!

breakfast club

March 4, 7-10:30 p.m., Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N. 1st Ave. in Sturgeon Bay

This authentic reproduction of the timeless musical and dance hits of the 80s will still have your blood pumping.

Ben Larsen

March 5, 1-4 p.m., Harbor Ridge Winery, 4690 Rainbow Ridge Road in Egg Harbor

American acoustic singer.

hunter gatherer

March 5, 2-5 p.m., Door County Brewing Co., 8099 Hwy 57 at Baileys Harbor

Americana, classic rock, alternative country and originals.

Captain John Acoustic Song Circle

March 5, 4-6 p.m., Hügel Haus, 11934 Hwy 42 at Ellison Bay

Stop with your acoustic instrument to sit and play, sing, listen and/or enjoy a good meal! All levels of players are welcome to join the band as they play country, bluegrass, folk, oldies and original music.

Cafe Concert Series

March 5, 7 p.m., Door Community Auditorium, 3924 Hwy 42 at Fish Creek

Wade Fernandez’s performance will close the Door County Talks and Coffeehouse Concerts series. The cost is $17.50 per person. A limited number of places will be available and a mask is required regardless of vaccination status.

cheese doodles

March 5, 7-10:30 p.m., Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N. 1st Ave. in Sturgeon Bay

With over 50 years of combined experience in music and entertainment, this duo can seamlessly transition from rock hits to classics and country and then back to pop favorites.

Karaoke

March 5, 9 p.m., Casey’s BBQ & Smokehouse, 7855 Hwy 42 in Egg Harbor

hip hop show

March 5, 10 p.m., Cherry Lanes Arcade Bar, 127 N. 4th Ave. in Sturgeon Bay

Featuring performances by Caesar, Chump Service, Drew Lines, Madhatta Mafia, R. Braille, Shawn Crutch, Sheol Dynasty and Space Kase.

Acoustic Music Mondays

March 7, all of Sister Bay

Play alongside seasoned musicians. Time and location change, so call Lloyd Michalsen at 920.737.3347 to learn more and participate.

Open mic

March 8, 9 p.m., Waterfront Mary’s, 3662 N. Duluth Ave. in Sturgeon Bay

Hosted by Adam Haste.

Acoustic interference

March 9, 1-3 p.m., Egg Harbor Library, 7845 Church Street in Egg Harbor

Open to all musicians, musical instruments, and ability levels, this jam will foster community as new musicians learn from other players and gain confidence. Auditors are also welcome.

Undeclared workers

March 11, 7-10:30 p.m., Stone Harbor Restaurant & Pub, 107 N. 1st Ave. in Sturgeon Bay

This seasoned duo plays a variety of genres from the 50s to today.

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Virtuoso preview: A virtual music-making sandbox for your inner child https://swedishmusicshop.com/virtuoso-preview-a-virtual-music-making-sandbox-for-your-inner-child/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/virtuoso-preview-a-virtual-music-making-sandbox-for-your-inner-child/ Virtuoso is a music-making VR app that transports your creative soul to the metaverse, even if you’ve never used an analog instrument before. Cumbersome bongos are finally a thing of the past and the music of tomorrow has never been so sparkling. I mean, just take a look at the glare of this trailer preview. […]]]>

Virtuoso is a music-making VR app that transports your creative soul to the metaverse, even if you’ve never used an analog instrument before. Cumbersome bongos are finally a thing of the past and the music of tomorrow has never been so sparkling. I mean, just take a look at the glare of this trailer preview.

By definition, a virtuoso is someone who excels in artistic technique, but that doesn’t really explain what this VR app is capable of. Developed by Stockholm-based Fast Travel Games (makers of Wraith: Oblivion – Afterlife), Virtuoso is set to officially launch on March 10 for $20 for Meta Quest and SteamVR users. The company describes Virtuoso as “a virtual music-making sandbox that lets anyone bring melodic creations to life in virtual reality.” Color me intrigued.

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Flute dolphins and music makes them jump https://swedishmusicshop.com/flute-dolphins-and-music-makes-them-jump/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 18:29:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/flute-dolphins-and-music-makes-them-jump/ Want to increase your chances of spotting dolphins? Playing the flute might be your best bet. A group of musicians from the Australian National University experimented with musical instruments and sounds that make bottlenose dolphins react. “Through maybe 25 years of experience, I’ve always noticed that if you want a good dolphin encounter, you sing […]]]>

Want to increase your chances of spotting dolphins? Playing the flute might be your best bet.

A group of musicians from the Australian National University experimented with musical instruments and sounds that make bottlenose dolphins react.

“Through maybe 25 years of experience, I’ve always noticed that if you want a good dolphin encounter, you sing or play an instrument,” says Olivia de Bergerac, a Sydney-based consultant who has participated in the expedition. “But this is the first time we’ve done it scientifically.”

In December, de Bergerac and the musicians of the ANU took a boat from Port Stephens, New South Wales, and gave a concert to the dolphins.

They played flute, piccolo and Indian recorder, as well as soprano singing. A hydrophone at the base of the boat recorded the responses from the dolphin pod.

Walker playing Pan and the birds to dolphins.

Flautist Sally Walker, a lecturer at ANU, says she and de Bergerac had been thinking about trying this for more than a decade.

“With the misfortune or fortune of my concerts being canceled last year and most of the previous year with COVID, it was time to do it,” says Walker.

“And of course it was a completely COVID safe concert experience because I was playing outdoors and with underwater mammals.”

Walker says the music she loved, rather than the “technically dazzling” music, was that thing that caught the Dolphins’ attention.

“I tried to play my favorite music, which is Bach, I played Telemann, Vivaldi. They really responded to the Bach, I noticed,” Walker says.

When Walker Tried Pan and the birds, by the French composer Jules Moquet, the basket has decided to follow the boat.

“It’s a pod of bottlenose dolphins that normally belong to Port Stephens Bay, and they had followed us out to sea. And then we stopped the boat, and played them this move, […] and they actually approached the boat,” says Walker.

“It was magical, because they were following us, and usually they don’t go out like that,” said de Bergerac.

The hydrophone recording with the sounds of the dolphins.

De Bergerac says some groups of Indigenous Australians used music and sound to communicate with dolphins. There is a long history of cooperative fishing between some Aboriginal Australians and the dolphins of eastern Australia.

“So it’s not new, but it’s the first time with a university that we’ve studied flute and dolphin response.”

Dolphins can hear a much wider range of sounds than humans, especially at higher frequencies.

“It’s also a way for them to scan things. The sound bounces back and they get a hologram in their melon, in their forehead,” de Bergerac explains. The melon is a mass of tissue that aids in echolocation.


Read more: Dolphin clitoris surprisingly similar to ours, study finds


Walker says that while the dolphins were a huge boon, playing the flute on a boat is no easy task.

“There were two main issues. The first is that salt corrodes silver very, very badly. So I didn’t dare play my professional flute on the boat. I was playing a student model flute that wasn’t really in great condition, so if it was damaged in any way it would be fine.

The second problem was the strength of the wind – always a risk outdoors, but higher on the boats.

“The wind can blow at an angle where it’s actually blowing through your flute,” says Walker. “And it sounds very weird, I can feel the sound coming right back to my face. […] I think there is no solution to this because I can’t control the winds.

The musicians are planning another boat trip in April, when they will try to listen to the chorus of dolphins on the hydrophone as they play.

“The next time we go out, Sally will play, but she will hear the sound of the dolphins and she will do a little improvisation session with them,” de Bergerac explains.

“It opens up all kinds of interesting areas,” says Walker.

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NingboLife and NingboExpat since 2004 https://swedishmusicshop.com/ningbolife-and-ningboexpat-since-2004/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 03:46:13 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/ningbolife-and-ningboexpat-since-2004/ Special Exhibition for Musical PIs in Ningbo Details Category: Ningbo News Posted: Thursday February 10th, 2022 11:31 AM The “music Ningbo” special exhibition for music IPs kicked off at Creative Ningbo Hall in Nantang Old Street on January 18. This immersive exhibition has built an audible and visible musical space for the public. Visitors […]]]>

Special Exhibition for Musical PIs in Ningbo

The “music Ningbo” special exhibition for music IPs kicked off at Creative Ningbo Hall in Nantang Old Street on January 18.

This immersive exhibition has built an audible and visible musical space for the public. Visitors can watch the exhibition through interactive means such as Audfly, code scanning and listening to songs, holographic projection, 3D ring screen, reproduction of musical instrument scenes, l experience of a vinyl record, etc. Six chapters, including “Ningbo Music Figures”, “Music Enterprises (Basics)”, “Music History”, “Musical Instruments”, “Music Cultural Creation” and “Scientific Music and technology”, have been exhibited on the site, displaying the achievements of the construction of “Ningbo music” in a combination of graphics, images, video and audio materials.

At the opening ceremony, Tu Jingnan, a national first-class performer, played Xun, an ancient musical instrument, which could be seen at the Hemudu site over 7,000 years ago. The Ningbo Symphony Orchestra’s string quartet group performed the classic song “Butterfly Love Story”, and the Ningbo Song and Dance Troupe performed the “tea picking dance”. On the site, famous Ningbo musicians such as Ms. Yu Lina, the performer of “Butterfly Love Story”, and Ma Youyou, the world-famous cellist, sent their blessings to the exhibition through the video.


Reportedly, during the exhibition period, there will be a series of activities, including the public intellectual property collection, a musicians’ seminar, vinyl record player sharing with young people, a music fair and musical instruments playing

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JEFFREY TRIPP Obituary (1943 – 2022) – Rockport, MA https://swedishmusicshop.com/jeffrey-tripp-obituary-1943-2022-rockport-ma/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 23:16:42 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/jeffrey-tripp-obituary-1943-2022-rockport-ma/ TRIPP, Jeffrey Died January 30, 2022, of a cerebral hemorrhage, the “sword of Damoclene” he would have lived under, which followed a heart valve replacement in 2008. But enough with his gloomier leanings and short career happy as an amateur diagnostician. He grew up in Philadelphia, graduated from Penn Charter in 1961, and was a […]]]>
TRIPP, Jeffrey Died January 30, 2022, of a cerebral hemorrhage, the “sword of Damoclene” he would have lived under, which followed a heart valve replacement in 2008. But enough with his gloomier leanings and short career happy as an amateur diagnostician.

He grew up in Philadelphia, graduated from Penn Charter in 1961, and was a member of the Amherst College Class of 1965, although he left for good in the fall of 1964 on his motorcycle, months away from graduation. .

His nomadic professional career was marked by his involvement in music, which began as a designer of popular guitar bridges in the colorful 70s music scene. Not two weeks before his death, he told me a story that I had never heard before about Tony Iommi delivering a bridge and the band being paid for a Garden gig out of a duffel bag full of cash. He then evolved with his time in the world of digital sound, designing many sound modulation tools still in circulation today. While the Synclavier 9600 Keyboard, Tripp Strip Ribbon Controller, Kurzweil MIDIBoard, and NoteBender are names you might only be able to drop with a certain sound engineer archetype, they’ve endured in their own way, and this sound engineer’s eyes will often light up. Well into his sixties, to his credit, his father picked up the NoteBender’s promise of three-dimensional sound manipulation in the mid-’80s and, along with collaborators Paul DeRocco and David Mash, updated it to suit the new computing power available as HyperKeys (see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsjX7W37Veg).

He was a talented guy who could and did fix devices, engines, musical instruments. The extent of his general knowledge was almost shocking at times, even if his speech on subjects of all kinds was, shall we say, a little infamous. He couldn’t talk about a young Tom Brady without saying “triangulate”. He would just assume in conversation that you had read The Western World’s Playboy, if you had never seen it staged. Or he might know you didn’t, but that wasn’t going to lessen one iota of his enthusiasm to make his point as if you did.

Her proudest accomplishment was raising her two boys, both of whom graduated from Rockport High School. Rockporters can recall how fervently engaged he was in our lives and our academic/athletic development, sometimes to the point of trying to referee ad hoc pickup games at Pingree Park. Teaching us stuff was really his idea of ​​a good time and he treated it, methodically, as a career of a lifetime. He could brag about his children with the worst of them.

He lived in many places before settling on the North Shore in March 1980, but after having taken up residence there, his adoption was complete, devotional. He remained under the influence of the landscape described by Charles Olson. Although he left Rockport in 2016 for what turned out to be a final chapter from Pleasant Pond to Wenham, he returned to the Long Beach Bridge every but the most spirited day.

He is survived by his two sons, Noel’s wife Liza and their daughters Lorelei, Ariel and Matilda, Lyle’s wife Hazel and their children Sienna, Walter and Briar Rose and his niece, Abigail (m. Barbara, 1945-2009 ), her husband Frank Talarico and their boys Tripp, Abe and Clive. We carry with us his love of basketball, Van Morrison, and the vagaries of the English language.

Informal service (GrampyFest 2022, anyone?) Scheduled for Memorial Day weekend, Cape Ann.

Donations humbly recommended to the Sheldrick Wildlife Trust (https://www.sheldrickwildlifetrust.org) (animal) or St. Jude (www.stjude.org) (human).

Arrangements by Greely Funeral Home, 212 Washington Street, Gloucester, MA 01930. For online condolences, please visit www.greelyfuneralhome.com

Published by Boston Globe from February 4 to February 6, 2022.

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Q&A: Dolapo Adedokun on IT, Ireland and all that jazz | MIT News https://swedishmusicshop.com/qa-dolapo-adedokun-on-it-ireland-and-all-that-jazz-mit-news/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 20:03:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/qa-dolapo-adedokun-on-it-ireland-and-all-that-jazz-mit-news/ Adedolapo Adedokun has a lot to look forward to in 2023. After graduating in Electrical and Computer Engineering next spring, he will travel to Ireland to undertake a Masters in Intelligent Systems at Trinity College Dublin as the fourth MIT student to receive the prestigious George J. Mitchell Scholarship. But there is more to Adedokun, […]]]>

Adedolapo Adedokun has a lot to look forward to in 2023. After graduating in Electrical and Computer Engineering next spring, he will travel to Ireland to undertake a Masters in Intelligent Systems at Trinity College Dublin as the fourth MIT student to receive the prestigious George J. Mitchell Scholarship. But there is more to Adedokun, which goes through Dolapo, than just academic success. In addition to being a talented computer scientist, the senior is an accomplished musician, an influential member of the student government and an anime fan.

Question: What motivates you the most to go to Ireland to study for a year?

A: One of the reasons I got interested in Ireland was when I heard about Music Generation, a national initiative for music education in Ireland, with the aim of giving every Irish child the access to the arts through access to music lessons, performance opportunities and music education. inside and outside the classroom. It made me think, “Wow, this is a country that recognizes the importance of arts and music education and has invested in making it accessible to people from all walks of life. I am inspired by this initiative and wish it was something I could have had growing up.

I am also very inspired by the work of Louis Stewart, an amazing jazz guitarist who was born and raised in Dublin. I am delighted to explore its musical influences and to delve into Dublin’s rich music community. I hope to join a jazz group, maybe a trio or quartet, and perform all over town, immerse myself in the rich Irish music scene, but also share my own styles and musical influences with the community there – low.

Question: Of course, while you’re at it you’ll be working on your HS in smart systems. I am intrigued by your invention of a smart home system that allows users to layer different melodies as they enter and exit a building. Can you tell us a bit more about this system: how it works, how you see users interacting with and experiencing it, and what you learned while developing it?

A: Funny enough, it actually started out as a system I worked on in my first year in 6.08 (Introduction to Embedded Systems) with a few classmates. We called it Smart HOMiE, an IoT [internet-of-things] Arduino smart home device that gathered basic information like location, weather and interfaced with Amazon Alexa. I forgot to work on it until I took 21M.080 (Introduction to Music Technology) and 6.033 (Computer Systems Engineering) in my first year, and I started to explore applications creatives of machine learning and computing in areas such as audio synthesis and digital instrument design. I’ve discovered amazing projects like Google Magenta’s Tone Transfer ML, models that use machine learning models to turn sounds into legitimate musical instruments. As I got to know this unique intersection of music and technology, I began to think about larger questions, such as: “What kind of creative future can technology create?” How can technology enable anyone to be expressive? “

When I had some free time at home for a year, I wanted to play around with some of the audio synthesis tools I had learned. I took Smart HOMiE and improved it a bit, made it a bit more musical. It worked in three main stages. First, multiple people could sing along and record melodies that the device would record and store. Then, using a few Python pitch correction and audio synthesis libraries, Smart HOMiE corrected the recorded melodies until they fit together, or generally fit in the same key, in musical terms. Finally, it would then combine the melodies, add harmony, or layer the track over a backing track, and in the end you did something really unique and expressive. It was definitely a bit disjointed, but it was one of my first times messing around and exploring all the work that has already been done by amazing people in this space. Technology has this incredible potential to make anyone a creator – I would love to create the tools to make it happen.

Question: You yourself are a jazz instrumentalist. Tell us more!

A: I’ve always had an affinity for music, but I didn’t always feel like I could become a musician. I had played the saxophone in college but it never really stuck. When I first came to MIT I was fortunate enough to take 21M.051 (Fundamentals of Music) and immerse myself in the proper music theory for the first time. It was in this class that I was exposed to jazz and that I completely fell in love with it. I will never forget returning to New House from the Barker Library during my freshman year and stumbling upon Bill Evans and Jim Hall’s “Undercurrent” – I think that’s when I decided to learn jazz guitar.

Jazz, and improvisation in particular, has taught me so much about what it means to be creative: to be willing to experiment, to take risks, to rely on the work of others, and to accept failure – all skills which I sincerely believe have made me a better technologist and leader. Most importantly, I think music and jazz taught me patience and discipline, and mastering a skill takes a lifetime. I would be lying if I said I was happy with my current situation, but every day I look forward to taking a step forward towards my goals.

Question: You focused on music and arts education, and the potential of technology to strengthen both. Is there a particularly influential class, technology, or teacher in your past that you can point to as a life-changing agent?

A: Whoa, difficult question! I think there are a few inflection points that have really driven change for me. The first was in high school when I discovered Guitar Hero, the musical rhythm video game that started as a project in the MIT Media Lab attempting to bring the joy of making music to people from all walks of life. It was then that I was able to observe the multidisciplinary influence of technology in the service of others.

The next one, I would say, was 6.033 at MIT. From the first day of class, the teacher [Katrina] LaCurts focused on understanding the people we design for. That we should view system design as inherently people-oriented – before we think about designing a system, we must first consider the people who will be using it. We need to consider their goals, their personalities, their backgrounds, the obstacles they face and, most importantly, the consequences of our design and implementation choices. I imagine a future where music, the arts, and the creative process are accessible to everyone, and I believe 6.033 has given me the foundation to build the technology to achieve this goal.

Question: You have also developed a passion for broadband infrastructure, which at first glance people might not get connected to music and education, your other two goals. Why is broadband such an important factor?

A: Before we can think about the potential of technology to democratize accessibility to music and the arts, we must first step back and think about accessibility. Which communities have increasingly less access to the appropriate technology that we often take for granted? I think broadband is only one factor in the realm of the bigger problem, which is accessibility, especially in minority and low-income communities. I see technology as the key to democratizing access to music and the arts for people from all walks of life, but this technology can only be the key if the basic infrastructure is in place for everyone. takes advantage. Just as I learned in 6.033, this means understanding the barriers of people and communities with the least access, and investing in critical core technological resources like fair high-speed internet access.

Question: Between your work on the Undergraduate Student Advisory Group in EECS, the Harvard / MIT Cooperative Society, the MIT Chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers, and of course all of your research and many academic interests, many readers must be drawn to ask if you’ve ever eaten or slept! How did you balance your busy life at MIT and maintain your self-esteem while accomplishing so much as an undergraduate student?

A: Excellent question! I’ll start by saying that it took me a while to figure it out. There were semesters where I had to drop classes and / or give up extracurricular commitments to find some balance. It’s always hard, to be surrounded by the brightest students in the world who are all doing amazing and amazing things, not to feel like you need to add one more class or one more UROP.

I think the most important thing, however, is to stay true to yourself – to figure out the things that bring you joy, that turn you on, and how many of those commitments are reasonable to make in each semester. I’m not a student who can take a million classes, research, internships, and clubs at the same time, but that’s totally okay. It took me a while to find the things I liked and understand the academic load that was appropriate for me each semester, but once I did I was happier than ever. I realized that things like playing tennis and basketball, playing with friends, and even sneaking into a few anime episodes here and there were really important to me. As long as I can look back each week, month, semester and year and say that I have taken a step forward towards my academic, social and musical goals, even the smallest, then I think I am taking action in the good direction.

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Astonishing tandem of percussionists Aimee and Gioia Francesco Dela Cruz https://swedishmusicshop.com/astonishing-tandem-of-percussionists-aimee-and-gioia-francesco-dela-cruz/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 12:29:48 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/astonishing-tandem-of-percussionists-aimee-and-gioia-francesco-dela-cruz/ Our star artists today are the mother-son tandem of Aimee Mina de la Cruz (percussionist) and her son Gioia (Gio) Francesco de la Cruz (violinist and percussionist). Aimee has been a guest on Culture Carousel as a soloist, as well as with some of her fellow co-members of the Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra (PPO). But this […]]]>


Our star artists today are the mother-son tandem of Aimee Mina de la Cruz (percussionist) and her son Gioia (Gio) Francesco de la Cruz (violinist and percussionist).

Aimee has been a guest on Culture Carousel as a soloist, as well as with some of her fellow co-members of the Philippine Philharmonic Orchestra (PPO). But this is the first time that we have introduced Aimee and her son Gio together.

Gio’s first public appearance was at the age of four, as a violinist in commemoration of his school’s founding day. Last year, he performed virtually during the percussion segment of PCC’s Trick and Musical Treats. Most recently, he performed marimba at the Virtual Recital of the Ilocano Sector of the Philippines of the Music Teacher’s Network Alliance (MTNA). He won the 2nd prize at the Mark and Pioneer International Music Competition in 2021 in the Soloist E category and the 3rd prize at the Bacoor International Music Championships 2021 in the Solo Xylophone / Marimba Junior Class category.

He was part of the Philippines team for the 2021 Asian Games in December and won honorable mention in the prodigy category of the Clara Schumann International Competition. Her father is the main PPO violist, Joy Allan de la Cruz.

We recently interviewed Aimee and Gio on our radio show, Culture Carousel, which airs every Saturday from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. on 98.7DZFE-FM, la Touche du Maître. Here are some excerpts from that conversation.

Was it natural for Gio to learn the marimba, or did he show signs that he wanted to be a singer?

Aimee: I have been teaching for almost 20 years now. I heard Gio and I can say, yes, he could sing. I answer this question as a teacher and not as a mother. It was natural for Gio to learn the marimba, he learns quickly and he has the rhythm and the height. One thing I really admire is that he plays with his accompaniment without my supervision.

Gio, what other musical instruments do you play?

In addition to the marimba, I also play the xylophone, timpani, piano and violin.

Isn’t competing stressful for you, Gio, in the midst of all your homework and other school stuff?

No, I don’t find it stressful, but I get scared every time I need to register to compete.

During this pandemic what are your “new normal activities” with your family?

A: Our family activities during this pandemic are of course playing musical instruments; bike just outside the house. I like to train and sometimes Gio trains with me.

G: For me, I really like building Lego and painting.

Aimée, how do you create artistic harmony in the family?

When we observed Gio, he actually started playing the piano when he was 3 years old. It was his father Joy, who then taught him. And at 4, he also introduced the violin to Gio. I just started to focus on teaching Gio percussion instruments at the start of the pandemic. We were right at home and were able to invest in a number of keyboard and percussion instruments. Seeing all these huge instruments, visually, it drew Gio to play them.

One day, during violin lessons, he told his father, he first wanted to focus on percussion instruments, especially the xylophone. So we respected his decision, first made him stop playing the violin and focused on xylophone lessons. The pandemic is quite a challenge for us musicians, especially for us percussionists.

Fortunately, the virtual contests have helped us to keep the interests of our students. As soon as I heard about the virtual contest, I asked Gio if he wanted to participate and he said yes. He chose a play suitable for his age. After a month, he noticed the violin and started playing his old songs. My husband saw the Clara Schumann International Competition and asked if Gio wanted to participate, and Gio said yes again. So this time he’s getting ready for a violin competition and a marimba recital. The program was therefore very busy. He had school until lunchtime, we took him a nap and he had marimba lessons with me for 30 minutes, and in the evening, an hour of lessons with his dad, preparation for a competition. violin. As parents, we do our best to respect his opinions and decisions about entering competitions and the instruments he would like to play.

Gio, how do you feel after a performance?

I feel happy because I have already finished playing a song that is too hard.

What is your New Year wish?

G: I wish I could play more timpani pieces. And I would like to win the first prize in a competition one day.

A: I wish Gio would continue to enjoy learning all the instruments we have here. Hearing that he wants more timpani pieces really turns me on. I also wish he would give us a yes the next time we ask him to enter a contest. It’s really amazing to see someone as young as him playing a huge instrument like the marimba which is why I hope his performances will inspire a lot of people especially young musicians and percussionists.


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Fingerpickin ‘good – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://swedishmusicshop.com/fingerpickin-good-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/fingerpickin-good-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune Jim Schoenbachler, left, practices chords under Jeff Ebnother at Tom’s Guitars in downtown Medford. Tom’s Guitars instructor Jeff Ebnother says musical instruments can be an enjoyable pastime After teaching music locally for nearly 30 years, Jeff Ebnother knows that music can come across as “a foreign language” to many people […]]]>


Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune Jim Schoenbachler, left, practices chords under Jeff Ebnother at Tom’s Guitars in downtown Medford.

Tom’s Guitars instructor Jeff Ebnother says musical instruments can be an enjoyable pastime

After teaching music locally for nearly 30 years, Jeff Ebnother knows that music can come across as “a foreign language” to many people who are learning an instrument for the first time.

And although studying music may be “slow” at first, he hopes his students can appreciate the value of learning a musical instrument.

“When you think of music, you can’t eat it, drink it, breathe it,” Ebnother said. “There is something about music that appeals to humans. It’s been like that since the dawn of time.

He teaches children and adults a range of instruments – electric guitar, bass, banjo and ukulele – at Tom’s Guitars, 1103 N. Riverside Ave., Medford.

Teaching her students in the local store is a full-time job, and Ebnother does it all from within the confines of her own space – with guitar scale posters and former Beatle John Lennon.

Outside of Tom’s, Ebnother oversees a studio in Ashland. Before that he was involved in one in Medford called Musichead.

For Ebnother, who studied music and geography at Southern Oregon University, teaching never got old. This is because it allows him to play and have positive interactions with people.

“Compared to other things, it’s about feeding people, helping people learn something new to them,” Ebnother said.

Where does the desire to play a musical instrument come from? Many of Ebnother’s students had a family member or friend who already knew this.

“Maybe their uncle was playing guitar and he would come over and play, and (they) would experience it and say, ‘Wow! It’s like magic. How do they do that with their fingers? ‘ ”Ebnother said.

Ebnother noted that even for music students who don’t perform live – like he did – doing it as a hobby requires dedication.

“Like a lot of things, you get out of it what you put in it,” he said. “If you stick with it (and) put in the time, the better you get, the more fun you have.” “

Ebnother recommends that students spend time alone with their instrument – rather than on the couch with a group of friends – to hone the craft.

“To become a good musician or even study music, it usually happens on your own; you need to have a calm workout time to do it without distraction to maintain your focus, ”Ebnother said.

When a musician approaches this musical perfection, “it is difficult to express in words” the feeling of accomplishment.

“You say to yourself, ‘Wow! I did it myself, ”Ebnother said. “I tell people that playing music is like cheap therapy – your problems aren’t going to go away, but they seem to be gone. “

If a player wants to venture out and play, even casually with others, the longtime music teacher recommends some dedication to the technical aspects of music, like learning to read it.

“It just helps their communication skills when working with other people who play music,” Ebnother said. “If somebody says, ‘hey, play a B flat chord’… everyone’s on the same page, they’re playing, they’re having fun. That’s why a very basic musicality, I think, is important.

Playing with a group can be a structured activity, much like music lessons. But when it comes to Ebnother, there is nothing wrong with “knotting” – a popular term for musical improvisation.

“You can start with structures like scales and arpeggios, but from there you have to put a little bit of yourself into it,” Ebnother said. “Noodle with those scales and arpeggios and come up with something that sounds good to your ear. I’m really big on it. You have to let go.

Above all, Ebnother tells his students, “You should always have fun playing music”.

Contact reporter Kevin Opsahl at 541-776-4476 or kopsahl@rosebudmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @KevJourno.


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