Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ Wed, 18 May 2022 20:17:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://swedishmusicshop.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1.png Musical instrument – Swedish Music Shop http://swedishmusicshop.com/ 32 32 Music to lend a hand to Ukrainian refugees – Monterey Herald https://swedishmusicshop.com/music-to-lend-a-hand-to-ukrainian-refugees-monterey-herald/ Wed, 18 May 2022 18:33:58 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/music-to-lend-a-hand-to-ukrainian-refugees-monterey-herald/ CARMEL — The tragedy of the war in Ukraine has rallied governments, organizations and individuals around the world to help people devastated by the conflict. Among those in our region who are mobilizing to make a difference is Carmel businessman Paul Laub. He leads a series of Ukrainian musical events to raise funds for the […]]]>

CARMEL — The tragedy of the war in Ukraine has rallied governments, organizations and individuals around the world to help people devastated by the conflict. Among those in our region who are mobilizing to make a difference is Carmel businessman Paul Laub. He leads a series of Ukrainian musical events to raise funds for the most vulnerable victims in war-affected parts of the country. The first of these concert programs takes place at the Forest Theater in Carmel on Sundays from 3-5 p.m.

The Ukrainian war strongly affected Laub. He admires President Zelenskyy’s strength and character and says as a veteran himself too old to be a soldier at 77, he still wants to do something to help, be a spark plug for good. as he calls it. With that in mind, he set out to find a way to raise money to help the cause.

“I asked my son Jason to find Ukrainian charities for me and he did. Then I asked charities if they had access to Ukrainian singers and musicians who would give concerts if I found the venues, with all proceeds going to help refugee women and children.

That’s how he found Hromada, a 501c3 organization in the San Francisco Bay Area with many resources already in place to support war-affected children, women, and refugees. The organization’s co-founder, Natalyia Anon, who works closely with Laub on fundraising, says the name Hromada is usually translated as “community,” but there’s more to it.

“Hromada means an intelligent, self-organized community of people working together towards a common goal,” she says. “The word is specific to Ukrainian. There is no equivalent word in other Slavic languages.

Oksana and Sviatoslav Stus will sing duets of folk and patriotic songs at a special fundraiser for Ukrainian refugees on Sunday. (Courtesy picture)

Among the volunteers linked to Hromada is a loose collective of Ukrainian musical artists who offer their talents to the organization’s charitable efforts. The audience of the Forest Theater will hear the vocal choir Kolyada sing the Ukrainian anthem and folk songs from their repertoire. The choir participates in many Californian music festivals as well as a wide variety of Ukrainian events. Ola Herasymenko Oliynyk, famous bandura player, will perform on this traditional Ukrainian stringed instrument. The famous Ukrainian singer Anychka will also perform in this program. Oksana and Sviatoslav Stus will sing duets of folk and patriotic songs. Soprano Oleksandra Zabashta, formerly of kyiv Opera, will perform gems from her repertoire, as will mezzo Oksana Manzhay of Lviv Opera. The program will be presented with two musical sections divided by a silent auction.

Hromada was founded in 2017 to serve the Ukrainian diaspora in this country. He started by publishing the first Ukrainian newspaper on the West Coast and quickly expanded his charitable mission to help orphaned children, families and refugees. Aware of the scale of the current humanitarian crisis in Ukraine, Hromada significantly stepped up the fundraising component of its operation when war broke out in February.

Hromada has no overhead and sends funds to Ukraine as they come in for immediate humanitarian assistance.

Born in Ukraine, Anon is a graduate of Stanford Business School and founder and CEO of Svitla Systems in the Bay Area, a high-tech company with an international profile. For the past four years, Anon and his colleagues at Hromada have been raising funds to help the children and families of Ukrainian soldiers fighting in the Donbass region. She says that in January this year, more than 3,000 children were already orphans.

“Since the start of the war, we have sent nearly $250,000 directly to charities and volunteers whom we trust from our previous relationships with them. They go directly into the war zones towards the most affected, the women and children. At this point there are over 50 organizations that we send micro grants to, $3,000 here, $2,000 there, $10,000 to other organizations, orphanages, refugee children and parents who have lost children. »

It tells the moving story of a group of orphans who were taken away from the besieged city of Mariupol, some of whom were born in 2022. Hromada sent funds to take care of newborn babies who were transferred to an orphanage in western Ukraine. Another charity in Dnipro, eastern Ukraine, which was not overrun, ferried trucks full of food, water and supplies to the bombarded city of Kharkiv. The supplies were distributed to refugees who were still in the city. Then the trucks were loaded with people who wanted to escape to safety in Dnipro. Hromada also sent money to organizations caring for children with special needs, such as autism or Down syndrome, and to buy food and water to distribute to the elderly in war zones.

“Through this work, I’ve been amazed at how many wonderful people I’ve met and how generous Americans are,” says Anon. She came to the United States 30 years ago and admires this country for the opportunities it offers immigrants for a better life. “The American Dream lives on despite everything you hear. I don’t know a single Ukrainian who came here and didn’t find his place in the sun. It is a truly blessed land.

Anon will be the spokesperson and master of ceremonies for the Forest Theater program and will share more information about the work of Hromada and their colleagues in Ukraine. A VIP evening for premium ticket holders will take place at the theater after the event, allowing attendees to talk to the artists in a more intimate setting, ask questions and enjoy a glass of wine.

The Pacific Repertory Theater made the space available by waving the main rental fee. Executive Director Stephen Moorer says: “At this time in the history of the world, I can’t imagine a more important cause.

The Ukraine Charity fundraiser takes place on Sundays from 3-5 p.m. Tickets are $40 per person and premium tickets are $60 (includes an afterparty with the artists). Tickets are available at the theater and online at www.hromada.us/concerts. Note that the website mainly contains information about the Ukrainian language, so click on “Concerts” in English, then on the Forest Theater program tab to buy tickets. When buying tickets online, please note in the comments: May 22 concert.

Although COVID protocols are subject to change, none are currently in place for this performance.

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Mandolin Cafe – The mandolin in modern music. Who needs rock? https://swedishmusicshop.com/mandolin-cafe-the-mandolin-in-modern-music-who-needs-rock/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/mandolin-cafe-the-mandolin-in-modern-music-who-needs-rock/ Photo credit: Steve Levine In 1969, the mandolin seemed poised to become a staple of rock ‘n roll and popular music. Over the next three years, no fewer lights than the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Band, the Grateful Dead and Rod Stewart would produce one or more songs featuring the instrument. Each of the […]]]>

Photo credit: Steve Levine

In 1969, the mandolin seemed poised to become a staple of rock ‘n roll and popular music. Over the next three years, no fewer lights than the Rolling Stones, Led Zeppelin, The Band, the Grateful Dead and Rod Stewart would produce one or more songs featuring the instrument. Each of the albums went platinum. And Stewart’s classic “Maggie May” simultaneously topped the pop charts in the US, UK, Canada and Australia.

The instrument’s future in popular music looked bright. Until suddenly it is no longer the case.

In the seven decades since, the mandolin has retained its beloved place in folk, country and bluegrass, even classical and occasionally jazz. Generally, however, the instrument that Phil Lesh of the Grateful Dead likened to “the ringing of a bell” has been absent from rock and pop, with bands like REM, Wilco, the White Stripes and others who have released some unique mandolin songs.

To find out why, the Mandolin Cafe spoke to successful and highly respected mandolin players from three very different schools of music: Ronnie McCoury, John Skehan and Sierra Hull at the 2022 Old Settler’s Music Festival.

About the Author: Steve Levine is a photojournalist and communications consultant based in Austin, Texas. Find his best words and pictures at linktr.ee/stlevine.

Their collective response: So what? The mandolin makes amazing music these days wherever it is played. It always has been – although some people have only heard it on these rock songs.

“When I was a young boy in the ’80s, my friends from Pennsylvania were like, ‘Oh, you play mandolin? Oh, what like Led Zeppelin or Grateful Dead?'” McCoury said. “And I was like, ‘Well, I don’t know what you’re talking about.'”

Ronnie McCoury

Photo credit: Steve Levine

It didn’t take long for him to understand. “I was in love with David Grisman’s music,” he said. “So I found out the guy playing the mandolin on the Grateful Dead stuff was David Grisman.” As he grew older, he met Zeppelin bassist John Paul Jones, who performed the mandolin parts with guitarist Jimmy Page on that 1970 album and on tour.

Skehan was also captivated by Grisman. “Somewhere someone gave me a tape of this debut Grisman Quintet album,” he said.

“It just blew my mind as to what you could do with the mandolin, the fact that Dawg had created his own signature form of music that was such a melting pot of other styles.”

His mandolin ear continued to grow.

John Skehan

Photo credit: Steve Levine

“For me, the big epiphanic discovery was the amount of mandolin music that exists without even getting into popular music,” Skehan said. “He has such a vast reach and influence on American music.”

McCoury tells a story that his father, Del McCoury, former Blue Grass Boys, tells. He credits a song by Bill Monroe on the mandolin as the inspiration for the creators of rock.

“There’s a tune Monroe sang called ‘Rocky Road Blues,’ it was like 1943 or 4, before Earl Scruggs came along and the bluegrass gelled,” the young McCoury said. “And he had that beat, and Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee [Lewis] and Elvis and all these guys were hearing that. And Carl Perkins said, ‘All we were doing was putting rhythm and blues and bluegrass together.'”

Chuck Berry, adds McCoury, “loved listening to Bill Monroe” because his mandolin stroke matched Berry’s distinctive guitar sound.

Fast forward around 70 years, and Hull finds the instrument still at home in any genre.

Sierra Hull

Photo credit: Steve Levine

“It’s such a diverse instrument,” said Hull, whose multitude of musical experiences belies his young age. “One of the things I like about him is that he can find his way into anything that’s missing in the context, regardless of the setup or the instrumentation.”

Skehan says he hears the influence of the mandolin in popular music that’s definitely not bluegrass, especially in the sounds of one of his favorite bands – the Grateful Dead.

“There’s this thing about the Grateful Dead that’s not really country music, but it’s not quite rock and roll and there’s this free-wheeling jazz element counterpoint, everything the world is improvising something,” he said. “But that weird, weird tone, what Bill Monroe called the old tones, the modal quality, and the fiddle music, it’s so present in the writing of the Grateful Dead songs and their approach, that out-of-left-field stuff. “

All three learned to play the mandolin in the Monroe tradition, where it acts as a percussion instrument in groups without drums.

Sierra Hull

Photo credit: Steve Levine

“I’d rather be playing rhythm all night than playing a lead, because it’s so much fun when you’re grooving and being part of that pocket,” said Hull, who – of course – is getting rave reviews. for his solo blisters. “At the same time, it’s fun to step away from that context a bit and then explore what else the instrument can do.”

After starting “a real bluegrass player”, Skehan has been playing alongside a drummer for decades in the jamgrass band Railroad Earth.

“I can work as a snare drum but in tandem with the snare drum, where the way I would sound the chords in a lower register when doing a bluegrass chop is a way of giving the snare drum the pitch and relevance of the changes okay,” he said. “But the snare also gives my backbeat that extra pop and punch.”

“I kind of got into this thing of doing backwards rakes against chords and then with a little delay it’s an arpeggiated piano chord or something,” Skehan added. “Just hitting a long chord and letting it ring out in that raked arpeggiated way and then starting to join the chop but being able to pull away again became something I do.”

John Skehan

Photo credit: Steve Levine

All three have played mandolin with rock bands and love the sound it brings to these performances. “It will continue to pop up unexpectedly in some recordings,” McCoury explains.

“All the good producer has to do is hear it in their head and want to produce it,” he said. “I guess they don’t find it useful on every song, and me as a mandolin player, yes.”

Just weeks after that interview, McCoury found himself playing mandolin at Nashville’s iconic Ryman Auditorium with an incredibly diverse group of artists, including Dead & Co’s Bob Weir, guitarist extraordinaire Billy Strings, the avant-garde bassist Les Claypool and Marty Stuart.

A few months earlier and less than a mile from the venerable Ryman, at the brand new Brooklyn Bowl Nashville, Hull had taken the stage with a very different ensemble. That night was part of a 21-date tour with Cory Wong and the Wongnotes. How does a mandolin find a voice with a funk band that includes a six-piece horn section?

Sierra Hull

“In the right context with the right musicians playing, with respect, kindness and drive, it can really be amazing in a lot of different musical situations,” Hull replied.

To translate these words into a musical experience, listen to “Over the Mountain” on Wong’s recently released album Power plant album. It opens with Hull playing a simple acoustic melody. She’s quickly joined by Wong’s guitar, and just as quickly the song turns into a soaring tour de force with Hull and Wong trading solos over and around the funky, driving bass lines of Sonny T (who played and recorded with Prince’s band The New Power Generation in the 1990s).

After discussing her tour with Wong during a backstage interview with Old Settler’s, Hull stopped and listened to the sounds of Peter Rowan and His Free Mexican Airforce filtering from the stage.

“The thing I will say about the mandolin,” she said with a smile, “it shines brightest when you can really hear the instrument and the woodwind on a microphone.”

Skehan remembers hearing acoustic music played on acoustic instruments at his first Winter Hawk or Gray Fox festival.

“The Del McCoury Band went to two microphones and produced this amazing sound,” he said, almost wistfully. “The mandolin is just plain cool. They’re icons of cool because they wield such an unlikely instrument in such a powerful way.”

Drew Emmitt and Ronnie McCoury

Photo credit: Steve Levine. Drew Emmitt with Ronnie McCoury

Further information

Photo credit: Steve Levine

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The opening night of the ANAM Set (Australian National Academy of Music) https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-opening-night-of-the-anam-set-australian-national-academy-of-music/ Mon, 16 May 2022 01:55:39 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/the-opening-night-of-the-anam-set-australian-national-academy-of-music/ It is worth saying at the outset that what the Australian National Academy of Music has achieved with its vast ANAM set is extraordinary; for its breadth, depth and for the fact that its conception emerged from an undeniably devastating period for musicians and composers around the world, this project is sure to go down […]]]>

It is worth saying at the outset that what the Australian National Academy of Music has achieved with its vast ANAM set is extraordinary; for its breadth, depth and for the fact that its conception emerged from an undeniably devastating period for musicians and composers around the world, this project is sure to go down in Australian music history. The works resulting from this year-and-a-half-long project are, as ANAM Artistic Director Paavali Jumppanen sums it up, “an immense survey” of living Australian creativity and innovation, the scale of which will hopefully be- the, aspirated, if not fully reproduced, several times in the future.

The backbone of the idea – commissioning sixty-seven composers to each write a piece for one of the ANAM 2021 musicians – seems simple enough; but the scale of the work, from finding composers to associating them with musicians, from the gargantuan task of administering the program, to the eventual categorization of works into enjoyable concerts, is staggering. Attending the opening night of the three-day festival was like joining marathon runners as they cross the finish line; we, the thrilled and raucous audience, played no part in getting there, but we were certainly thrilled to be there with the musicians and songwriters who did.

“There are about 50 composers in the room tonight,” creative coordinator Leigh Harrold noted in his introductory remark. “You may be sitting next to one!” Delighted laughter echoed in the audience – as is rare to be found among so much lively creativity. Together, the works performed throughout the festival could be described as an anthology of new pieces, and Harrold had endeavored to extract them – however stylistically different – ​​for themes that could serve as guidelines. He ultimately chose six themes that would be celebrated throughout the festival, with the opening night featuring tasters of each: the intimacy between a performer and their instrument, nostalgia or works with a distinct lineage, the sounds of an agenda, loss and hope, the natural world, and perhaps problematically, “intellectual powers”. The categorization, which deserves to be explored in more detail, however, could not contain the music – starting with the triumphal of William Barton Song of the trip.

Journey Song by William Barton on the opening night of the festival The ANAM Set. Photo © Pia Johnson.” width=”2500″ height=”1667″ srcset=”https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577.jpg 2500w, https://limelightmagazine. com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577-300×200.jpg 300w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577-1024×683.jpg 1024w, https: //limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577-768×512.jpg 768w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577-1536×1024.jpg 1536w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_0577-2048×1366.jpg 2048w” sizes=”(max-width: 2500px) 100vw, 2500px”/>

Josiah Kop and William Barton performing William Barton’s Song of the trip to The ANAM set opening night of the festival. Photo © Pia Johnson.

A French horn and a didgeridoo? Sure. The chord: unexpected, perhaps, but at first listen extremely sonorous and well adapted. The two instruments (performed brilliantly by Josiah Kop and Barton himself) created their own sonic world that somehow came together as if nothing could be more natural. Kop and Barton breathed together without needing to glance at each other, such was the musical understanding between the two. Kop’s crisp, clear notes shifted easily between soaring and rhythmic driving. The two instruments took charge at different times; Barton’s didgeridoo accompanies Kop’s deeply melodious solos, before becoming a real duet and bouncing off one another, almost as if improvised. Barton, as music lovers know, is a virtuoso – a magician, pulling rabbits out of a hat as he paints new worlds with his instrument. An added joy: Barton’s vocalization over driving rhythms in the French horn. The final unison ostinato patterns to conclude the piece ended triumphantly, drawing rapturous applause.

“If that’s any indication of what we have in store,” I noted as I listened, “then we really are going to have something very special.” The beat changed when flautist Lily Bryant took the stage for Matthew Laing Destructive interference. The title comes from a physical phenomenon that occurs when two audio waves overlap and cancel each other, leading to a lower amplitude; a phenomenon Laing was drawn to after the lost years due to COVID. “The experience of the pandemic has been so overwhelming that it necessitates undoing,” he noted, and his play which was, perhaps, an elegy to lost opportunities allowed a ray of hope through darkness. The piece started out as a whisper, a gasp, as if it had experienced a false start before it could continue. As Bryant, who masterfully navigated the intricate, balletic work, got going, the room grew wings, leading to a bigger question – what happens next? Laing has a keen sense of movement; his work is specific to choreography, to bodies moving in space, and this work, which was as much about the silence he wrote as it was about the notes, was no exception.

James Morley performing Cello Playing - as Meteorology by Liza Lim at the opening night of the ANAM Set festival.  Photo © Pia Johnson.

James Morley playing Liza Lim Playing the cello – like meteorology to The ANAM set opening night of the festival. Photo © Pia Johnson.

The concept of movement and a musician’s deep relationship with their instrument continued in the program’s culmination, Liza Lim’s Playing the cello – like meteorology, played by James Morley. If weather is the way we were to look at this piece, then the cello was the weather; Morley our meteorologist, guiding us by turns gently, then hard, then contemplatively through the changing events. He appeared on stage with no music, no chair, just his instrument and two bows. Lim had Morley standing with the cello leaning against him, singing and strumming across the bridge with both bows – creating something both tough and beautiful. There again, a deep sense of choreography, of improvisation; a reminder of each musician’s long period of development with their composer. When Morley concluded, arms in the air holding those two bows aloft, there was a moment of silence before applause. It’s a piece that I hope Morley will continue to play and grow with as he himself continues to develop what promises to be a very fine career.

Two more explorations of solo instruments followed: Kate Tempany’s Honeyeater for trumpeter Nicholas Corkeron and Fantasia No 7 by Elizabeth Younan for bassist Kenneth Harris. Tempany’s work celebrated the honeyeater’s song and the fate the bird faces as the species declines. Corkeron negotiated multiple mute changes and onstage moves with ease, his playing accomplished and full of character. Younan’s deeply virtuosic fantasy made the most of Harris’ skills, allowing him to improvise and show his dexterity, leaping between the composer’s small and changing musical cells.

Cian Malikides et Alexander Meagher interprètent <i>a little word crab-it’s-my-fault</i> by Chris Dench on the opening night of the festival <i>The ANAM Set</i>.  Photo © Pia Johnson.” width=”2500″ height=”1667″ srcset=”https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347.jpg 2500w, https://limelightmagazine. com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347-300×200.jpg 300w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347-1024×683.jpg 1024w, https: //limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347-768×512.jpg 768w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347-1536×1024.jpg 1536w, https://limelightmagazine.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/ANAMSetFestival_photoPiaJohnson_1347-2048×1366.jpg 2048w” sizes=”(max-width: 2500px) 100vw, 2500px”/></p>
<p id=Cian Malikides and Alexander Meagher performing Chris Dench’s a little word crab-it’s-my-fault to The ANAM set opening night of the festival. Photo © Pia Johnson.

Finally, Harrold stood up to talk about the last piece – the “intellectual heavyweight”. I felt a stiffness around me as he spoke of the last category of composers who used substantial inspirations for their works – mathematics, science, literature. Didn’t the other composers we heard this evening, and who would be heard at other times during the festival, have high aspirations for their pieces? Couldn’t they also be called intellectuals? by Chris Dench a little word crab-it’s-my-fault for trombone and percussion, brilliantly performed by trombonist Cian Malikides and percussionist Alexander Meagher, was a delightfully character-driven duo. The trombone has become the crab of his great adventure, the percussion offering mimicked occasions of peril, of security, of challenge. Dench’s piece was strange and dense, yet with a great sense of wit and humor; a delicious end to an exceptional night.

And yet, the categorization seemed tacky and worth noticing. New contemporary Western art music, as Jumppanen pointed out at the opening of the concert, often has a program, and often is himself a diary. Composers rely on years of trial and error, or reading, listening, watching, thinking to write their works. Some plays fail, others are smash hits. Many never get the praise they deserve. Classifying sixty-seven new works is no easy task, but defining certain composers in the “intellectual” category, with profound implications which, in this case, intellectual equals well, does a disservice to all composers – those included in this category. and those who are not.

It cannot be overstated the work that has fallen on Harrold’s shoulders to put together a festival of this magnitude, but to assert in front of a room full of creators – many of whom would be heard throughout the weekend – that their inspirations do not were not noble enough to be considered in this heady category was disappointing and off-putting. Fortunately, while the pieces will stick around long after we’re no longer around to hear or perform them, the categories they’ve been relegated to will be a thing of the past.

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Mendelssohn Chorus takes robots “beyond the binary” https://swedishmusicshop.com/mendelssohn-chorus-takes-robots-beyond-the-binary/ Sat, 14 May 2022 10:03:58 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/mendelssohn-chorus-takes-robots-beyond-the-binary/ The “binary” in the title refers to a common narrative trope commonly attributed to robots: that they are either submissive to humans or bent on destroying them. This dichotomy was exposed in this early robot story by Čapek, in which a population of artificial people are at first happy – even delighted – to be […]]]>

The “binary” in the title refers to a common narrative trope commonly attributed to robots: that they are either submissive to humans or bent on destroying them. This dichotomy was exposed in this early robot story by Čapek, in which a population of artificial people are at first happy – even delighted – to be occupied with menial work, but eventually rise up and kill their creators.

Of course, in 1921, Čapek did not invent the idea of ​​artificial humans, a concept that dates back to ancient Greek, Jewish and Norse mythologies. What the playwright did in 1921 was give them hard labor, naming them after the Slavic word robota, or forced labor.

“We originally thought that this play would start where the play ends,” Clearfield said, referring to RUR’s final act when the robots destroy all of humanity and set out to create a new population of humans. artificial beings. “Then we decided that it might be interesting to have these different paintings based on the themes discussed in the play.”

The 120-voice Mendelssohn Choir and soloists rehearse for “Beyond the Binary” at Queen Village Settlement School. (Emma Lee/WHY)

These century-old themes have not entirely disappeared. Mark Yim, professor of mechanical engineering at Penn and director of the GRASP lab, said one of the problems scientists and engineers are currently facing is the same central tenet of RUR: robots that kill.

“One of the big things the robotics community is struggling with is what we call lethal autonomous weapons systems (LAWS),” Yim said. “It’s something that’s really difficult now with Ukraine and the war going on. There are semi-autonomous drones. They use robotic technology and it helps to defend Ukraine. Maybe defense is a good thing, but at the same time all of war is really bad. Killing people is wrong.

The GRASP laboratory mainly works on interdisciplinary projects with other fields, developing autonomous technologies for architecture, design and medicine. Yim finds it valuable that her students also work in the arts, to develop creative thinking in addition to technical problem solving.

The self-driving technology that Yim and his team of Penn students are developing for “Beyond the Binary” is unlikely to kill anyone. Sunday’s performance will feature mechanical flowers that respond autonomously to certain musical cues, opening their petals and glowing when triggered by specific sounds.

Select Fillmore audience members will receive built-in handheld pods with colored LED lights, which they can turn on at will like an electronic version of a Bic lighter.

Penn GRASP Lab student Noam Aizenberg holds one of fifty devices that will be used for dynamic crowd lighting during the performance of 'Beyond the Binary'.
Penn GRASP Lab student Noam Aizenberg holds one of fifty devices that will be used for dynamic crowd lighting during the performance of “Beyond the Binary.” (Emma Lee/WHY)

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Secret Theater – Queens Gazette https://swedishmusicshop.com/secret-theater-queens-gazette/ Thu, 12 May 2022 18:45:52 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/secret-theater-queens-gazette/ By gazette | on May 12, 2022 Hey everyone, Matilda Jr is a hit! The Secret Theater opened Matilda Jr on April 28 to sold-out crowds at every show. This is their first show where they combined some of their juniors with the senior musical theater groups and they also included some new […]]]>

Hey everyone, Matilda Jr is a hit! The Secret Theater opened Matilda Jr on April 28 to sold-out crowds at every show. This is their first show where they combined some of their juniors with the senior musical theater groups and they also included some new faces in their cast. Kaila Wooten, Rosie Green and Julia Mechner have been incredibly dedicated to the show and their young cast. They are very satisfied with the results. It’s probably their biggest casting ever. They are also very grateful to various parents who stepped in to help at the door, concessions and behind the scenes. Thank you. There are very few tickets left but you can try this link: www.eventbrite.com/e/matilda-jr-tickets-296034646597. If you are unsuccessful and cannot find tickets, please email Tasnim at sta@secrettheatre.com who may be able to assist you.

The ACT ONE: ONE ACT FESTIVAL is BACK.

Call for entries for their annual festival of short plays. They’re looking for games that last around 10-15 minutes, with 20 minutes being an absolute maximum. Games longer than 20 minutes will be rejected. Apply at form.jotform.com/92725721858972. Still three weeks before the submission deadline.

NEW MUSICAL AND SINGING INSTRUMENT COURSES.

Kaila Wooten now teaches Ukele, as well as piano and vocals!

Samantha Sayah will be returning to faculty soon and is available for vocals or piano, Artistic Director Richard Mazda is hiring a limited number of guitar and bass guitar students. Richard is an award-winning songwriter and producer who has toured the world with various bands [all in his spare time.].

Book now with Tasnim – contact sta@secrettheatre.com or call 718 433 9030

This summer they will be offering summer camps in several locations. their regular teachers including Samantha, Kaila, Michael, Regina and Sophia will be returning and they are adding teachers including choreographer Matilda Rosie and other new faces. Seats are filling up, REGISTER TODAY at secrettheatre.com/sta-camps/.

Special returns from the princess!

Mazda’s wacky kids’ show about a princess who wants to be a ballerina returns May 14 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are available at www.eventbrite.com/e/princess-particular-tickets-266347993017?aff=ebdssbdestsearch/

Pirate Pete will be back once his peg leg is termite treated. Their performances will be at the newly constructed Secret Theater located at 38-02 61st St., Woodside 11377:

The Secret Theater also offers new classes with new teachers. Check out their teacher biographies on the website, secrettheatre.com.

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Westby’s Randy Dahlen plays fiddle and continues family’s love of Norwegian music | News https://swedishmusicshop.com/westbys-randy-dahlen-plays-fiddle-and-continues-familys-love-of-norwegian-music-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/westbys-randy-dahlen-plays-fiddle-and-continues-familys-love-of-norwegian-music-news/ Kathy Anderson Westby Area Historical Society Great American composer Leonard Bernstein’s comment, “Music can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable”, is probably understood by many people in Westby, as Norwegians are known to be people who talk little and do a lot of music. They are also known to be wonderful carpenters and we […]]]>

Kathy Anderson Westby Area Historical Society

Great American composer Leonard Bernstein’s comment, “Music can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable”, is probably understood by many people in Westby, as Norwegians are known to be people who talk little and do a lot of music. They are also known to be wonderful carpenters and we are fortunate to have people in the Westby area who have shared their musical talents with us as singers, instrumentalists and luthiers.

What is a luthier you ask me? Joseph Dahlen was a luthier – a luthier. Born in Christiana Township in 1888, Joe was the second of five children and the only son of Norwegian immigrants Even and Maria Dahlen. He started carving at the age of 29 because he needed something to keep him awake as he cared for his elderly father at night and farmed during the day. Farmers are busy people, so it seems Joe has little time for a hobby, but he’s become quite a prolific carpenter. “Grandpa Joe made some great woodcarvings,” his grandson, Randy Dahlen, recently shared. Not only did he carve beautiful figures, but with very specialized equipment that he made, he created at least five violins that family members still own. There’s a children’s violin, a special banjo-like instrument, and even an extraordinary Norwegian Hardanger violin he made in 1936.

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Hardanger fiddles are unique in that they typically have eight strings, but only four are played. The four strings that are never touched, called the substrings or sympathetic strings, sit below the four active strings and vibrate to create the unique sound that Hardanger violins are known for. Grandpa Joe crafted his beautiful Hardanger violin with many intricate and artful details. The fingerboard is an inlay design made up of several different types of wood; the tailpiece is a beautifully carved piece of bone; and the scroll is a beautifully carved horse’s head.

Joe’s carpentry skills were passed down to his son, Art Dahlen, who many of you would know as a master carpenter and local furniture maker. Joe’s love for music was passed on to his grandson, Randy, and his great-grandchildren, Kory and Karlee. Randy still listens to music, but shared that the only time he played an instrument was when Kory had to teach someone to play a string instrument for a college class. Randy laughed as he recounted his success in learning musical scales and “Hot Cross Buns” on a violin so his son could earn those college credits. Kory, an accomplished trumpeter, is now the band principal at Westby High School and Karlee plays flute and piccolo.

After Art Dahlen passed away in 1997, as often happens, the family came across a long-forgotten box that Art had obtained when Grandpa Joe died. The specialized equipment Joe used to make violins, all the tools he had made himself, were fortunately still safe and in excellent condition in that box. They were just waiting for the right person to come and put them back into service.

Building a violin requires immense talent for minute detail, skill and patience. When Randy went through his grandfather’s stringed instrument box, he decided it might make for an interesting hobby and something he could continue to work on years later when he retires. Like others after high school, Randy started college courses in one area, drafting and design, before moving on to another, agribusiness. The idea of ​​making a violin, with many different parts and parts, the fine tuning, firm hand carving and intricate detailing seemed like something that suited his personality and interests.

Randy worked as a pump jockey for the Westby Farmers’ Union while in high school and college. He continued in product sales and as a division manager at Tri-State Breeders. After Cashton Co-op Elevator and Westby Farmers’ Union merged to form Heartland County Co-op, Randy became General Manager and finally Vice President when Heartland merged with Premier Co-op. When he and his wife, Betty, were raising a family all those years, Randy was also involved in various community and religious organizations and served as a local municipal judge for twenty-one years. There was little time for a hobby until her retirement in 2018 and, sadly, more time since Betty passed away last September. Since then, Randy has seriously devoted his efforts to Grandpa Joe’s passion, making his own violin.

There are twenty-four pieces of wood in the body, not including the front, back, or neck, which are crafted and carefully glued together in Randy’s violin frame. He explained that maple, spruce, willow and ebony are used for specific parts and areas to provide strength or flexibility, to be molded into the necessary curves. Randy explained that the hardness of each of these woods resonates a little differently as the air vibrates from the strings that are played through the body of the violin creating sound. The density or hardness of the many types of wood used to make a violin is what creates the richness of sound produced by the instrument.

The top, or face, of a violin is thin to allow sound to resonate through the body but loud enough to stand the test of time. Because it can crack after several years of use or because of humidity problems, the different woods that make up a violin are cut, carved, bent, then glued with animal glue which can be “broken” if a violin must be disassembled. To be repaired.

Randy’s fiddle face is made of two pieces of spruce that are glued together. He then very carefully sculpted the glued pieces by hand to deliberately give them a thickness of two to three millimeters in very specific places. The surface of the glued boards is carved with a tool that scoops the wood so that the face of the violin is not a flat surface. Facing the violin, there are also two “F-holes” which allow the sound to come out of the instrument. Randy said the whole face shaping process can be stressful. It is so thin that you have to be careful not to crack the wood while working to hollow out the curved surfaces and then cut the F-holes.

The sides, or tips, and back are maple for added strength and because they resonate differently than softer spruce. Because maple is very hard, it must be steamed to make it flexible enough to bend. Grandpa Joe made a very special mold that would hold the wood until it dried into the familiar shape of a violin. Randy took after Grandpa Joe and made many of his own tools that help make and shape parts for his violin.

Very thin strips of willow are glued inside the parts of the violin. These strips are used to reinforce the instrument and as ledges where the front and back can be glued to the sides.

There are blocks of wood that are glued at specific points inside the violin before the face is attached. A base bar, glued to the inside surface of the face, and a sound rod support the face and relieve the “bridge”, the piece of wood that holds the strings above the face of the instrument. Interestingly, the bridge is not glued to the surface of the violin. Only the pressure of the strings keeps it in place and it must periodically be repositioned. It should also be noted that the position of the basic bar and the soundpost are very specific in relation to the feet of the bridge.

To beautify the instrument and finish the surface, Randy will first apply an alcohol varnish or shellac to seal the wood. It cannot stain the wood with anything that can penetrate the surface as this will affect the sound quality. Three coats of shellac with different stains are applied to give a nice smooth color to the violin. Randy will follow the custom of not finishing the underside of a violin’s neck with varnish, shellac, or stain, but perhaps just a light coat of tung oil, to help the violinist play the tool. Depending on the task and the time needed between all the building stages, Randy works between an hour or two to four hours at a time on the fiddle.

Ty from Old Towne Strings in La Crosse will do the final setup for Randy’s instrument. He will insert the “soundpost”, basically a pin that needs to be placed inside the violin between the top and bottom in the right place to take the pressure of the strings. He will also pass the strings between the tailpiece near the bottom of the face and the pegs at the top of the neck, then tune the violin. When finished, Randy will have to wait for a refresher lesson from Kory to play his violin, but can immediately take credit for continuing his family’s story of the Norwegian musical heritage established by his ancestors. Randy has produced a beautiful work of art that will live on for many years after he is gone. His children, grandchildren and even his great-grandchildren will enjoy his violin, and perhaps others he makes, just like him, his son Kory and his daughter Karlee speak of the love of their great -father and great-grandfather Joe for the music. As we celebrate our Norwegian heritage at Syttende Mai, the story of their Norwegian family’s love of music is a wonderful gift to our community.

Editor’s note: Randy Dahlen’s violin is currently being strung and tuned. As soon as it is returned, we will post a photo of the finished violin.

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Nottingham Music Shop ‘Windblowers’ to close after almost 40 years https://swedishmusicshop.com/nottingham-music-shop-windblowers-to-close-after-almost-40-years/ Mon, 09 May 2022 20:22:42 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/nottingham-music-shop-windblowers-to-close-after-almost-40-years/ Photo Credit: Paul Robinson / CC by 2.0 A Nottingham music store could disappear without a new owner. Windblowers on Derby Road has been around for almost 40 years. Opened by David Oldershaw and Margaret Frogson, Windblowers have been selling sheet music and instruments since 1983. The couple plan to retire and are looking for […]]]>

Photo Credit: Paul Robinson / CC by 2.0

A Nottingham music store could disappear without a new owner. Windblowers on Derby Road has been around for almost 40 years.

Opened by David Oldershaw and Margaret Frogson, Windblowers have been selling sheet music and instruments since 1983. The couple plan to retire and are looking for a new owner for the business, saying it’s ‘time to pass the baton’. Without a new owner, the shop will close at the end of the year.

Oldershaw was working as an engineer in the late 1970s when he had the idea of ​​starting a music store. Frogson said they quickly needed to hire additional staff when the store opened because the business “has grown tremendously.”

“It’s our baby and it’s our livelihood,” Oldershaw said. “It took us all over the world – we went to virtually every European country with one orchestra or another, playing or supporting.”

“The family doesn’t want to take it on and we’re getting too old,” Frogson added. “We are really sad that this is the end of an era.”

Windblowers have had many well-known clients in the music industry, including the Kanneh-Mason family of Nottingham. Cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason won the BBC Young Musician Award in 2016, the first black musician to do so since the competition was established in 1978.

Winner of the SME Midlands Enterprise award for best independent music retailer in 2019, Windblowers have long been at the heart of the music community in England. The shop is proud to support the Nottingham Music Hub and is a registered participant of the Art Council’s Take It Away initiative.

The Nottingham Music Hub helps young people in the city develop their musical skills and take part in performances. Take It Away is a scheme which “allows people aged 18 to 25 to apply for a loan of up to £2,000 for the purchase of any type of musical instrument and pay it back in nine monthly installments, interest free. ”

Windblowers offers an assisted instrument purchase program in addition to the Take It Away program and instrument repairs. The shop is open Tuesday through Saturday and instrument testing is available by appointment.

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Mozart Sinfonia Concertante (Australian Chamber Orchestra) https://swedishmusicshop.com/mozart-sinfonia-concertante-australian-chamber-orchestra/ Sun, 08 May 2022 06:14:11 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/mozart-sinfonia-concertante-australian-chamber-orchestra/ When Frank Bridge took on 14-year-old Benjamin Britten as a pupil, the budding composer was already producing some impressive works, including an Elegy for Strings – he stipulated 68 to be precise. It was never performed during his lifetime and only received its premiere in 2013 at the London Proms as part of his centenary. […]]]>

When Frank Bridge took on 14-year-old Benjamin Britten as a pupil, the budding composer was already producing some impressive works, including an Elegy for Strings – he stipulated 68 to be precise. It was never performed during his lifetime and only received its premiere in 2013 at the London Proms as part of his centenary.

Richard Tognetti and the Australian Chamber Orchestra’s 17 Strings gave it its first outing to Australian audiences at the start of their latest tour, and we’ve already got a glimpse of big things to come amongst the lush Elgarian layering. Restless and urgent rather than elegiac, it has some interesting twists – a little fugue here, a pastoral episode there – and made an excellent opening for this program of a teenage work and a mature work by Britten and his big hero Mozart.

Stefanie Farrands. Photo ©Stephen Ward.

The main work of the evening was Mozart’s Sinfonia Concertante, which featured new ACO member Viola Stéphanie Farrands. The 33-year-old, who joined the Emerging Artists Scheme aged 19, was appointed in 2020 after her tenure as principal of the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra.

It was a top drawer performance, with the two soloists combining seamlessly throughout all three movements. The cadenzas of the first and second movements were a highlight and in the first movement Tognetti and the ACO in this string arrangement brought out the textures and colors of Mozart’s score – the pizzicatos, the cellos in harmony taking the parts of horn, all giving a different dimension look that you don’t normally get from the full orchestral version.

The intertwining solos of Tognetti and Farrands were so impressive that the audience burst into spontaneous applause at the end of the first movement.

The two instruments – Tognetti’s 1743 Guarneri and Farrand’s 2016 Berlin viola – were also paired and married in the moving andante, Mozart’s lament for his recently deceased mother.

Mozart was only a year older than the youthful Britten when he wrote the Divertimento in D major, and this work is firmly embedded in my childhood musical DNA because it was the first Mozart I known – even before the ubiquitous Eine Kleine Nachtmusik – from a low-budget LP my dad bought.

The sound quality emitted from the ACO, however, was far superior, I’m happy to say.

Ten years after starting lessons with Bridge, Britten showed her debt and gratitude with her Variations on a Theme by Frank Bridge – 11 short pieces that lovingly depict the qualities of his teacher and friend.

Tognetti and his band gave a haunting performance of these cameos – the Adagio with its anguished violins swaying on sinister chords suspended in the lower strings, the trampling Classic Boureethe slightly maniac Viennese Waltz and the superbly executed perpetual motorcycle.

No wonder the older composer was so moved by his protege’s wonderful tribute.

And in a concert that celebrated the oft-maligned viola and its manifest glories, it is worth remembering Bridge’s touching gesture when he said goodbye to the pacifist Britten, who had gone to America to await the end of the war. He offered his old pupil his precious instrument as a parting gift.


The Australian Chamber Orchestra is running its Mozart Sinfonia Concertante program until May 23. Tour information here.

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DJ Q&A: Candice Choi | Culture & Leisure https://swedishmusicshop.com/dj-qa-candice-choi-culture-leisure/ Sat, 07 May 2022 03:42:00 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/dj-qa-candice-choi-culture-leisure/ CREATING HARMONY ONE NOTE AT A TIME: CURRENT MUSICIANS DIRECTOR CANDICE CHOI CREATES A COMMUNITY FOR STUDENTS, YOUNG AND OLD. DJ: You are a music teacher and director of a school for musicians. How did you come to your profession? CC: I was born and raised in Daly City. Both sides of my family are […]]]>

CREATING HARMONY ONE NOTE AT A TIME: CURRENT MUSICIANS DIRECTOR CANDICE CHOI CREATES A COMMUNITY FOR STUDENTS, YOUNG AND OLD.

DJ: You are a music teacher and director of a school for musicians. How did you come to your profession?

CC: I was born and raised in Daly City. Both sides of my family are rooted in the San Francisco area. I have lived and worked in San Mateo County since returning to the area 9 years ago. I spent time in college at the University of the Pacific Conservatory of Music in Stockton, California, and graduate school at Westminster Choir College of Rider University in Princeton, New Jersey before returning to Daly City to begin the music school of my dreams.

DJ: Why did you create Musicians in the Making?

CC: Growing up as a music student, I always thought learning the piano was a lonely endeavor. I didn’t know any other serious pianists until I went to college. From college and graduate school, in addition to my postgraduate scholarship, I learned the importance of community in creating strong musicians. When I created Musicians in the Making in 2013, my vision was to create a school of music where our students see themselves as a community that can enhance each other’s musical abilities, the same way athletes on a team support each other. I also wanted to create a program that connects students in the Bay Area with other musicians around the world.

DJ: How has your business evolved over the years?

CC: I started Musicians in the Making in my home studio in Daly City. We now have a teaching faculty of seven and an office administrator with three school campuses and online courses. All of our students take private or small group lessons as well as monthly group performance classes where our students can collaborate with each other. We also offer Early Years Music, where young students are introduced to the musical elements in their minds and bodies. Our students perform in unique recitals three times a year. Some of our past recitals include holiday music concerts at senior residences, concerts at our own Musicians in the Making carnival in the park, and concerts for an international music competition in Indonesia. Last year, our school was also treated to a master class given by America’s Got Talent finalists, Sons of Serendip.

DJ: What was your musical training?

CC: I first discovered music at the age of five when I started taking piano lessons. My first teacher was a piano teacher in San Francisco who ran a small home piano studio. I had many mentors and teachers from coast to coast who influenced my musical career. Professors Ingrid Clarfield, Phyllis Lehrer and Paul Sheftel of Westminster Choir College have developed me as an advanced performer and pedagogue. Marvin Blickenstaff and Amy Glennon of the New School for Music Study have had a strong influence on my teaching style. Professor Benedict Lim from City College of San Francisco inspired me to expand my studio. Professors Keith Hatschek, Frank Wiens and Dr. Rex Cooper of the University of the Pacific Conservatory of Music developed my solid foundation for musical and commercial success.

DJ: What is the most popular instrument?

CC: Our most popular instrument to study is the piano. Indeed, the piano is a musical instrument that helps develop a broad foundation for future musical studies. If students decide they want to learn other instruments as they get older, knowing the piano gives them an advantage. Our students use the piano, keyboard, violin, guitar and ukulele.

DJ: How old is your youngest student? Your eldest?

CC: Our youngest student is 2 years old and our oldest student is 50 years old.

DJ: What would you say to a parent considering music lessons for a child or an adult considering taking music lessons?

CC: Learning an instrument is simply the vessel through which we teach lifelong lessons. We use music to help children express themselves emotionally and develop confidence and self-discipline in a fun, collaborative environment. Children at our school make lifelong friends and learn to use music purposefully through community service opportunities and other community events. For adults considering learning music for the first time, learning music is like learning a new language. New musicians learn to express themselves in unique and beautiful ways while sharpening their cognitive skills. Playing music is a way to release the stress of our busy lives while creating something beautiful. For adults who already have musical experience, our teachers are excellent at rekindling the love of music.

Susan Cohn is a member of the San Francisco Bay Area Theater Critics Circle and the American Theater Critics Association. She can be reached at susan@smdailyjournal.com.

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San Antonio Public Library Celebrates Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month – The City of San Antonio https://swedishmusicshop.com/san-antonio-public-library-celebrates-asia-pacific-american-heritage-month-the-city-of-san-antonio/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:50:44 +0000 https://swedishmusicshop.com/san-antonio-public-library-celebrates-asia-pacific-american-heritage-month-the-city-of-san-antonio/ CONTACT: Victoria Villarreal, 210-207-2614 Victoria.Villarreal2@sanantonio.gov SAN ANTONIO (May 4, 2022) – May is Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month. In honor of this celebration, the San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) is celebrating with programs, activities, and online content throughout the month of May. Visit the Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month SAPL guide for more information. Asia Pacific American […]]]>

CONTACT: Victoria Villarreal, 210-207-2614
Victoria.Villarreal2@sanantonio.gov

SAN ANTONIO (May 4, 2022) – May is Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month. In honor of this celebration, the San Antonio Public Library (SAPL) is celebrating with programs, activities, and online content throughout the month of May. Visit the Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month SAPL guide for more information.


Asia Pacific American Heritage Month Events at SAPL



What is Umami?
Saturday May 7 | 5 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Online | Registration required.
Umami is the fifth basic taste in food (besides sweet, sour, salty and bitter) discovered by Japanese chemist Dr. Kikunae Ikeda in 1908. Want to know more about it? To celebrate Asia-Pacific American Heritage Month, Dr. Makiko Fukuda, Ph.D. Teacher of Instruction, Japanese, UTSA will give a presentation on umami. This is an online program.





Discover tabla music
Monday May 9 | 6 p.m. – 7 p.m. | Igo Branch Library
Friday May 20 | 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. | Online (registration required.)
A professional Tabla music player from Sanageet Bharati America Inc. will show you how to play the tabla, followed by a Q&A session. The tabla is a musical instrument made up of two small drums of slightly different sizes and shapes. The playing technique is complex and involves extensive use of fingers and palms in various configurations to create a wide variety of different sounds and rhythms.



Strings and feet: demonstration and presentation of two art forms
Friday, May 13, 7 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Online | Registration required.
Join us for this introduction to the Veena, a classical Indian instrument, and Bharatanatyam, a classical dance.



Classical dance performance: Bharatanatyam
Saturday May 14 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. | Library of San Pedro
Thursday May 19 | 7 p.m. – 8 p.m. | Online (registration required.)
Saturday May 21 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. | Thousand Oaks Library
Tuesday May 24 | 6:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. | Pruitt Library
Saturday May 28 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. | Semmes library
Sunday May 29 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m. | Parman Library
Bharatanatyam is one of the most subtle and sophisticated dance forms in the world. It features classical Indian dance embodying music and storytelling based on specific themes. This one-hour professional dance performance will be followed by an interactive demonstration and a question-and-answer session.



Use of the violin: Indian ragas and emotions
Saturday May 14 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Online | Registration required.
Join us as Samspra Academy Music Faculty member Ananda Nadayogi provides a presentation and demonstration of musical ornamentations in Indian music and how they convey emotions in Indian musical compositions.



Create colorful rangoli/kolam
Saturday May 21 | 2 p.m. – 3 p.m.

Online | Registration required.
Join us to create a traditional floor design used for ornamental or ceremonial design during traditional festivities.


For more information on library services, visit mysapl.org. Library staff are available by phone at 210-207-2500 or by chat at ask.mysapl.org.

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